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Indianapolis News
The ''Indianapolis News'' was an evening newspaper published for 130 years, beginning December 7, 1869, and ending on October 1, 1999. The "Great Hoosier Daily," as it was known, at one time held the largest circulation in the state of Indiana. It was also the oldest Indianapolis newspaper until it closed and was housed in the Indianapolis News Building from 1910 to 1949. ''Note:'' This includes and Accompanying photographs. After Eugene C. Pulliam, the founder and president of Central Newspapers acquired the ''News'' in 1948, he became its publisher, while his son, Eugene S. Pulliam, served as the newspaper's managing editor. Eugene S. Pulliam succeeded his father as publisher of the ''News'' in 1975. See also: Gugin and James E. St. Clair, eds., pp. 275–77. The ''Indianapolis News'' was an evening paper, and its decline matched a growing circulation of the morning newspaper, the ''Indianapolis Star''. Prior to the closing, there had been a partial merging of the newspaper s ...
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Indianapolis News Building
Indianapolis News Building, also known as the Goodman Jewelers Building, is a historic commercial building located at Indianapolis, Indiana. It was designed by architect Jarvis Hunt (1863–1941) and built in 1909–1910. It is a ten-story, rectangular, Neo-Gothic style brick and terra cotta building. It is three bays wide and 10 bays deep. The top floor features a corbelled terra cotta balcony, Tudor-like window openings, and a Gothic parapet. It is located next to the Taylor Carpet Company Building. The building housed the ''Indianapolis News'' until 1949. ''Note:'' This includes and Accompanying photographs It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance or "great artistic ... in 1984. It is located in the Washington Street–Monument Circ ...
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Kin Hubbard
Frank McKinney Hubbard (September 1, 1868 – December 26, 1930), better known as Kin Hubbard, was an American cartoonist, humorist, and journalist. His most famous work was for " Abe Martin". Introduced in ''The Indianapolis News'' in December 1904, the cartoon appeared six days a week on the back page of the ''News'' for twenty-six years. The Abe Martin cartoons went into national print syndication in 1910, eventually appearing in some two hundred U.S. newspapers. Hubbard also originated and illustrated a once-a-week humor essay for the "Short Furrows" column in the Sunday edition of the ''News'' that went into syndication in 1911. The self-taught artist and writer made more than eight thousand drawings for the Indianapolis ''News'' and wrote and illustrated about a thousand essays for the "Short Furrows" column. His first published book was ''Collection of Indiana Lawmaker and Lobbyists'' (1903), followed by an annual series of Abe Martin-related books between 1906 and 1930, as ...
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Ladies' Home Journal
''Ladies' Home Journal'' was an American magazine last published by the Meredith Corporation. It was first published on February 16, 1883, and eventually became one of the leading women's magazines of the 20th century in the United States. In 1891, it was published in Philadelphia by the Curtis Publishing Company. In 1903, it was the first American magazine to reach one million subscribers. In the late 20th century, changing tastes and competition from television caused it to lose circulation. Sales of the magazine declined as the publishing company struggled. On April 24, 2014, Meredith announced it would stop publishing the magazine as a monthly with the July issue, stating it was "transitioning ''Ladies' Home Journal'' to a special interest publication". It was then available quarterly on newsstands only, though its website remained in operation. The last issue was published in 2016. ''Ladies' Home Journal'' was one of the Seven Sisters, as a group of women's service mag ...
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Parke County, Indiana
Parke County lies in the western part of the U.S. state of Indiana along the Wabash River. The county was formed in 1821 out of a portion of Vigo County. According to the 2010 census, the population was 17,339, an increase of 0.6% from 17,241 in 2000. The county seat is Rockville. It has a population density of about . The county contains six incorporated towns and many unincorporated communities. It is divided into 13 townships which provide local services. Two U.S. Routes and five state highways pass through or into the county, along with one major railroad line. Parke County has 31 covered bridges and describes itself as the Covered Bridge Capital of the World. It is the site for the Parke County Covered Bridge Festival which has been held in October each year. As of 2020, Parke County is included in the Terre Haute, Indiana, Metropolitan Statistical Area. History This area had been occupied for thousands of years by succeeding cultures of indigenous peoples. The ...
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Turkey Run State Park
Turkey Run State Park, Indiana's second state park, is in Parke County in the west-central part of the state along State Road 47, east of U.S. 41. The first parcel of land was purchased for $40,200 in 1916, when Indiana's state park system was established during the state's centennial anniversary of its statehood. ''Note:'' This includes and Accompanying maps and photographs. The origin of the name "Turkey Run" is unknown, but the most accepted theory is that wild turkeys would congregate for warmth in the gorges (or "runs"), where early settlers could easily trap and hunt them. The Lusk Home and Mill Site and the Richard Lieber Log Cabin within the park's grounds were included as individual sites on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and 2001, respectively. The park itself was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2019. Turkey Run also includes a system of trails, Rocky Hollow Falls Canyon Nature Preserve, a suspension bridge across Sugar ...
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Rockville, Indiana
Rockville is a town in Adams Township, Parke County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. The population was 2,607 at the 2010 census. The town is the county seat of Parke County. It is known as "The Covered Bridge Capital of the World". History Rockville was laid out in 1824, three years after the county was founded, and became the county seat. In 1825, its population was between 500 and 600. The residents voted to incorporate the town in July 1854. The Rockville Chautauqua Pavilion and Rockville Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Alexander Ferguson, relative of a Salem witch, opened up a restaurant in Rockville with a famous celebrity many years ago. An earthquake measuring 3.8 on the moment magnitude scale was recorded in the city and confirmed by the USGS on June 17, 2021, with numerous aftershocks reported in cities around the state and Illinois Geography Rockville is located at the intersection of U.S. Route 36 and U.S. Route 41, abo ...
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Juliet V
Juliet Capulet () is the female protagonist in William Shakespeare's romantic tragedy '' Romeo and Juliet''. A 13-year-old girl, Juliet is the only daughter of the patriarch of the House of Capulet. She falls in love with the male protagonist Romeo, a member of the House of Montague, with which the Capulets have a blood feud. The story has a long history that precedes Shakespeare himself. Juliet's age As the story occurs, Juliet is approaching her fourteenth birthday. She was born on "Lammas Eve at night" (1 August), so Juliet's birthday is 31 July (1.3.19). Her birthday is "a fortnight hence", putting the action of the play in mid-July (1.3.17). Her father states that she "hath not seen the change of fourteen years" (1.2.9). In many cultures and time periods, women married and had children at a young age. Lady Capulet had given birth to her first child by the time she had reached Juliet's age: "By my count, I was your mother much upon these years that you are now a maid. ...
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Nina Mason Pulliam
Nina Mason Pulliam (September 19, 1906 – March 26, 1997) was an American journalist, author, and newspaper executive in Arizona and Indiana, where she was also well known as a philanthropist and civic leader. Pulliam began her career as a journalist in Indiana and worked with her husband, Eugene C. Pulliam, as founding secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of Central Newspapers, Incorporated, the media holding company he established in 1934. Following her husband's death in 1975, she served as president of the company until her retirement, in 1979, and as publisher of two of the company's newspapers, the ''Arizona Republic'' and the ''Phoenix Gazette'', from 1975 to 1978. She also wrote a series of articles that were published in North American newspapers and later compiled into several books. During her lifetime and through the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust, which was established after her death in 1997, Pulliam contributed to numerous philanthropic projects to s ...
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First Amendment To The United States Constitution
The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents the government from making laws that regulate an establishment of religion, or that prohibit the free exercise of religion, or abridge the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the freedom of assembly, or the right to petition the government for redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was proposed to assuage Anti-Federalist opposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted more narrowly than they are today. Beginning with '' Gitlow v. New York'' (1925), the Supreme Court applied the First Amendment to states—a process known as incorporation—through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In ''Everson v. Board of Education'' (1947), the Court drew on Thom ...
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Bellefontaine, Ohio
Bellefontaine ( ) is a city in and the county seat of Logan County, Ohio, Logan County, Ohio, United States, located 48 miles (77 km) northwest of Columbus, Ohio, Columbus. The population was 13,370 at the 2010 United States Census, 2010 Census. It is the principal city of the Logan County, Ohio, Bellefontaine, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Logan County. The highest point in Ohio, Campbell Hill (Ohio), Campbell Hill, is within the city limits. History The name Bellefontaine means "beautiful spring" in French language, French, and is purported to refer to several springs in the area. However, locally, the original French pronunciation is not used, and it is pronounced "bell fountain." Blue Jacket's Town Around 1777, the Shawnee (tribe), Shawnee war chief Blue Jacket (''Weyapiersenwah'') built a settlement here, known as "Blue Jacket's Town". Blue Jacket and his band had previously occupied a village along the Scioto River, but the American Revolutiona ...
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Abe Martin (comic Strip)
''Abe Martin'' was an American newspaper gag-a-day comic strip, drawn by Kin Hubbard and published from 1904 until 1937 in ''The Indianapolis News'' and other newspapers. Character Abe Martin was an anti-hero character, making wisecracker jokes and uttering sayings which became popular over the country. He made his first appearance on December 17, 1904.Weaver, Bill"Abe Martin Lives,"Our Brown County. Accessed Nov. 18, 2018. Originally the character's locality wasn't specified, but in a strip from February 3, 1905, he announced: "I'm goin' ter move ter Brown County Tewmorrow", which he did. At the time the character's popularity was such that by 1910 over 200 newspapers carried the strip and special almanacs were made. Notable fans were George Ade, Will Rogers and James Whitcomb Riley. Early version The ''Indianapolis News'' published a cartoon by Hubbard on September 15, 1904, featuring another character named Abe Martin. Other one-panel cartoons of the era * ''Ching Chow ...
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Journalist
A journalist is an individual that collects/gathers information in form of text, audio, or pictures, processes them into a news-worthy form, and disseminates it to the public. The act or process mainly done by the journalist is called journalism. Roles Journalists can be broadcast, print, advertising, and public relations personnel, and, depending on the form of journalism, the term ''journalist'' may also include various categories of individuals as per the roles they play in the process. This includes reporters, correspondents, citizen journalists, editors, editorial-writers, columnists, and visual journalists, such as photojournalists (journalists who use the medium of photography). A reporter is a type of journalist who researches, writes and reports on information in order to present using sources. This may entail conducting interviews, information-gathering and/or writing articles. Reporters may split their time between working in a newsroom, or from home, and goin ...
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