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Harvard Boxing Club
The Harvard Boxing Club is a student organization at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. History Boxing has been a popular campus activity since the late 19th century. In the intramural tournament of 1879, future President Theodore Roosevelt faced C.S. Hanks in the lightweight championship and lost, after a controversial late hit by Hanks. According to historian Edmund Morris, the crowd started booing Hanks, prompting Roosevelt to put up his hands and shout “It's alright, he didn’t hear he bell��. When Roosevelt campaigned for the Presidency, his supporters would frequently recall this anecdote as an early example of his extraordinary character. Boxing became an official varsity sport in 1922, per recommendation of the Harvard Athletic Committee, and Harvard boxers performed well against their Ivy League opponents (amassing a 25:11:4 record from 1930 to 1937). The team expanded during World War II, when all undergraduates were required to participate in intercolle ...
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Harvard University
Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1636 as Harvard College and named for its first benefactor, the Puritan clergyman John Harvard, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and one of the most prestigious and highly ranked universities in the world. The university is composed of ten academic faculties plus Harvard Radcliffe Institute. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences offers study in a wide range of undergraduate and graduate academic disciplines, and other faculties offer only graduate degrees, including professional degrees. Harvard has three main campuses: the Cambridge campus centered on Harvard Yard; an adjoining campus immediately across Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston; and the medical campus in Boston's Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is valued at $50.9 billion, making it the wealthiest academic institution in the world. Endow ...
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Tony Awards
The Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes excellence in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League at an annual ceremony in Midtown Manhattan. The awards are given for Broadway productions and performances. One is also given for regional theatre. Several discretionary non-competitive awards are given as well, including a Special Tony Award, the Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre, and the Isabelle Stevenson Award. The awards were founded by theatre producer and director Brock Pemberton and are named after Antoinette "Tony" Perry, an actress, producer and theatre director who was co-founder and secretary of the American Theatre Wing. The trophy consists of a spinnable medallion, with faces portraying an adaptation of the comedy and tragedy masks, mounted on a black base with a pewter swivel. The rules for the Tony Awards are set forth in th ...
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College Boxing Teams In The United States
A college (Latin: ''collegium'') is an educational institution or a constituent part of one. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, a part of a collegiate or federal university, an institution offering vocational education, or a secondary school. In most of the world, a college may be a high school or secondary school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, a higher-education provider that does not have university status (often without its own degree-awarding powers), or a constituent part of a university. In the United States, a college may offer undergraduate programs – either as an independent institution or as the undergraduate program of a university – or it may be a residential college of a university or a community college, referring to (primarily public) higher education institutions that aim to provide affordable and accessible education, usually limited to two-year assoc ...
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Sport At Harvard University
Sport pertains to any form of competitive physical activity or game that aims to use, maintain, or improve physical ability and skills while providing enjoyment to participants and, in some cases, entertainment to spectators. Sports can, through casual or organized participation, improve participants' physical health. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals. In certain sports such as racing, many contestants may compete, simultaneously or consecutively, with one winner; in others, the contest (a ''match'') is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other. Some sports allow a "tie" or "draw", in which there is no single winner; others provide tie-breaking methods to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion. Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a ...
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Cambridge University Amateur Boxing Club
Cambridge University Amateur Boxing Club (CUABC) is the boxing club of the University of Cambridge, England. The club was founded in 1896 after the King's College Boxing Club amalgamated with Fordham's School of Arms to form the Cambridge University Boxing & Fencing Club (CUB&FC). The club has competed against Oxford University Amateur Boxing Club in the Varsity Match each year since 1897 to win the Truelove Bowl. Typically, the match location switches between Oxford and Cambridge, though recently Cambridge have hosted matches in London. Boxers who compete in the Varsity Match are traditionally awarded a Full Blue by the Cambridge University Men's Blues Committee if they win individually or the team wins. Other boxers, such as those having been selected for a second Varsity Match, can be awarded a Blue at the discretion of the committee. In the 2005 Varsity Match, Kaleen Love of Oxford defeated Catherine Tubb of Cambridge in the first women's varsity boxing bout. Catherine Tubb ha ...
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Oxford University Amateur Boxing Club
The Oxford University Amateur Boxing Club (OUABC) is the boxing club of the University of Oxford, England, located in Oxford. The club was founded in 1881. It is the second-oldest active amateur boxing club in the UK. Several OUABC boxers were featured in a 2006 documentary titled '' Blue Blood''. The club competes against Cambridge University Amateur Boxing Club in The Varsity Match, also known as The True Love Bowl, each year. Typically, the match location switches between Oxford and Cambridge, though some matches have been held in London. In 2003/2004, OUABC began including female boxers in training and matches. In the 2005 Varsity Match, Kaleen Love of Oxford was the first Oxford woman to compete in a Varsity boxing match, and defeated Catherine Tubb of Cambridge Both were awarded Extraordinary Full Blues for their athletic accomplishments. During the 1980s and 1990s, under the tutelage of head coach Henry Dean, OUABC won 17 Varsity Matches in a row, the longest single st ...
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StudentsFirst
StudentsFirst is a political lobbying organization formed in 2010 by Michelle Rhee, former school chancellor of Washington D.C. public schools, in support of education reform. The organization worked to pass state laws on issues such as expanding charter schools and teacher tenure reform. On March 29, 2016, it announced some of its state chapters would merge with 50CAN, and its Sacramento headquarters would downsize. Policy positions StudentsFirst organizes its policy agenda into three categories: "elevate teaching," "empower parents," and "govern well." Under what it calls "elevate teaching," StudentsFirst has sought to eliminate the "last in, first out"—or LIFO -- seniority system for laying off public school teachers, based on the premise that such a system promotes a sense of "adult entitlement" among teachers. The organization also supports teacher evaluation systems based on improvement in student test scores, and does not believe such assessment systems cause teacher ...
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Michelle Rhee
Michelle Ann Rhee (born December 25, 1969) is an American educator and advocate for education reform. She was Chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools from 2007 to 2010. In late 2010, she founded StudentsFirst, a non-profit organization that works on education reform. She began her career by teaching for three years in an inner city school, then founded and ran The New Teacher Project. Early life and education Rhee was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the second of three children of South Korean immigrants Shang Rhee, a physician, and Inza Rhee, a clothing store owner. She was raised in the Toledo, Ohio area and educated in public schools, through the sixth grade. Her parents then sent her to South Korea to attend school for one year. Upon her return, they enrolled her in a private school because they felt the public school was lacking. She graduated from the private Maumee Valley Country Day School in 1988, and went on to Cornell University where she received a B.A. ...
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University Of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (also known as Penn or UPenn) is a private research university in Philadelphia. It is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and is ranked among the highest-regarded universities by numerous organizations and scholars. While the university dates its founding to 1740, it was created by Benjamin Franklin and other Philadelphia citizens in 1749. It is a member of the Ivy League. The university has four undergraduate schools as well as twelve graduate and professional schools. Schools enrolling undergraduates include the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Wharton School, and the School of Nursing. Among its highly ranked graduate schools are its law school, whose first professor wrote the first draft of the United States Constitution, its medical school, the first in North America, and Wharton, the first collegiate business school. Penn's endowment is US$20.7 billion ...
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Anthony Braga
Anthony Allan Braga (born 1969) is an American criminologist and the Jerry Lee Professor of Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania. Braga is also the Director of the Crime and Justice Policy Lab at the University of Pennsylvania. He previously held faculty and senior research positions at Harvard University, Northeastern University, Rutgers University, and the University of California at Berkeley. Braga is a member of the federal monitor team overseeing the reforms to New York City Police Department (NYPD) policies, training, supervision, auditing, and handling of complaints and discipline regarding stops and frisks and trespass enforcement. Research Braga’s research focuses on enhancing fairness and effectiveness in policing. With colleagues, he has completed randomized controlled trials testing the impacts of deploying body worn cameras on police officers in Boston, Las Vegas, and New York City. These studies generally suggest that the placement of body cameras improve th ...
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The Executioner's Song
''The Executioner's Song'' (1979) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning true crime novel by Norman Mailer that depicts the events related to the execution of Gary Gilmore for murder by the state of Utah. The title of the book may be a play on "The Lord High Executioner's Song" from Gilbert and Sullivan's ''The Mikado''. "The Executioner's Song" is also the title of a poem by Mailer, published in '' Fuck You'' magazine in September 1964 and reprinted in ''Cannibals and Christians'' (1966), and the title of one of the chapters of his 1974 novel ''The Fight''. Notable for its portrayal of Gilmore and the anguish generated by the murders he committed, the book was central to the national debate over the revival of capital punishment by the Supreme Court in ''Gregg v. Georgia'', 428 U.S. 153 (1976). Gilmore was the first person to be executed in the United States since the reinstatement of the death penalty in 1976. Background In April 1976, Gilmore, aged 35, was released from prison after ser ...
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The Armies Of The Night
''The Armies of the Night: History as a Novel/The Novel as History'' is a nonfiction novel recounting the October 1967 March on the Pentagon written by Norman Mailer and published by New American Library in 1968. It won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction and the National Book Award in category Arts and Letters. Mailer's unique rendition of the non-fiction novel was perhaps his most successful example of new journalism, and received the most critical attention. ''In Cold Blood'' (1965) by Truman Capote and '' Hell's Angels'' (1966) by Hunter S. Thompson had already been published, and three months later Tom Wolfe would contribute ''The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test'' (1968). Background ''Armies of the Night'' deals with the March on the Pentagon (the October 1967 anti-Vietnam War rally in Washington, D.C.) The book emerged on the heels of two works—'' An American Dream'' and ''Why Are We in Vietnam?''—whose mixed receptions had disappointed Mailer. In fact, he was ...
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