HOME



picture info

Harley Street
Harley Street is a street in Marylebone Marylebone (usually , also , , , ) is a district in the West End of London The West End of London (commonly referred to as the West End) is a district of Central London, west of the City of London and north of the River Thames, in which m ..., central London Central London is the innermost part of London London is the capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. The city stands on the River Thames in the south-east of Engla ..., which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine Medicine is the science Science () is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts ( descriptive knowledge), skills (proced ... and surgery Surgery ''cheirourgikē'' (composed of χείρ, "ha ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

St Pancras Railway Station
St Pancras railway station (), also known as London St Pancras or St Pancras International and officially since 2007 as London St Pancras International, is a central London railway terminus on Euston Road Euston Road is a road in Central London Central London is the innermost part of London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on ... in the London Borough of Camden The London Borough of Camden () is a London borough The London boroughs are the 32 districts of England, local authority districts that make up the Ceremonial counties of England, ceremonial county of Greater London; each is governed by a .... It is the terminus for Eurostar Eurostar is an international high-speed rail service connecting the United Kingdom with France, Belgium and the Netherlands. Most Eurostar trains travel through the Channel Tunnel between the United Kingdom a ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Grantly Dick-Read
Grantly Dick-Read (26 January 1890 – 11 June 1959) was a British obstetrician and a leading advocate of natural childbirth. Early life and education Dr. Grantly Dick-Read was born in Beccles, Suffolk on 26 January 1890, the son of a Norfolk miller and the sixth of seven children. Educated at Bishop's Stortford College and St John's College, Cambridge, Cambridge, he was an excellent athlete and horseman. He received his medical training at Royal London Hospital, the London Hospital, Whitechapel, where he qualified as a physician in 1914. Career and work During World War I, Dick-Read served with the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was badly wounded at Gallipoli but later served in France. When the war ended, he returned to the London Hospital for a year and then completed an Higher doctorate, MD at Cambridge. In the early 1920s, he worked at a clinic in Woking and it became very popular. Dick-Read specialised in childbirth and care, observing and writing up case histories and not ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Wilkie Collins
William Wilkie Collins (8 January 1824 – 23 September 1889) was an English novelist and playwright known especially for '' The Woman in White'' (1859), and for ''The Moonstone ''The Moonstone'' (1868) by Wilkie Collins William Wilkie Collins (8 January 1824 – 23 September 1889) was an English novelist and playwright known especially for ''The Woman in White (novel), The Woman in White'' (1859), and for ''The Mo ...'' (1868), which has been proposed as the first modern English detective novel Detective fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction Crime fiction, detective story, murder mystery, mystery novel, and police novel are terms used to describe narratives that centre on criminal acts and especially on the investigation, either by a .... Born to the London painter William Collins and his wife, he moved with them to Italy when he was twelve, living there and in France for two years and learning Italian and French. He worked initially as a tea merchant. After ''Ant ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

George Frederick Bodley
George Frederick Bodley (14 March 182721 October 1907) was an English Gothic Revival Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, neo-Gothic, or Gothick) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. The movement gained momentum and expanded in the first half of the 19th century, as increasingly ... architect An architect is a person who plans, designs and oversees the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings that h .... He was a pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott Sir George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878), known as Sir Gilbert Scott, was a prolific English Gothic revival architect, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals, although he started h ..., and worked in partnership with Thomas Garner Thomas Garner (1839–1906) was one of the ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

William Beechey
Sir William Beechey (12 December 175328 January 1839) was a leading English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually become the World language, leading lan ... portraitist during the golden age of British painting The Art of the United Kingdom refers to all forms of visual art in or associated with the United Kingdom since the formation of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707 and encompass English art, Scottish art, Welsh art and Irish art, and forms par .... Early life Beechey was born at Burford Burford () is a small medieval town on the River Windrush, in the Cotswolds, Cotswold hills, in the West Oxfordshire district of Oxfordshire, England. It is often referred to as the 'gateway' to the Cotswolds. Burford is located west of Oxfor ..., Oxfordshire, on 12 December 1753, the son of William Beechey, ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Queen's College, London
Queen's College is an Independent school (UK), independent school for girls aged 11–18 with an adjoining prep school for girls aged 4–11 located in the City of Westminster, London. Founded in 1848 by theologian and social reformer Frederick Denison Maurice along with a committee of patrons, the College was the first institution in the world to award academic qualifications to women. In 1853, it also became the first girls' school to be granted a Royal Charter for the furtherance of women's education. Ever since, the College patron has been a British queen; the current patron is Queen Elizabeth II. The College has a distinctly liberal ethos based upon the principles of F. D. Maurice. History In 1845, David Laing, chaplain of the Middlesex Hospital raised funds with a committee of patrons to acquire a building at 47 Harley Street with the intention of creating a home for unemployed governesses. Laing was keen to develop the institution to provide governesses with an educati ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Lionel Logue
Lionel George Logue, (26 February 1880 – 12 April 1953), was an Australian speech and language therapist Speech is human vocal communication using language. Each language uses Phonetics, phonetic combinations of vowel and consonant sounds that form the sound of its words (that is, all English words sound different from all French words, even if the ... and amateur stage actor An actor is a person who portrays a character in a performance (also actress; see below). The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of performing art that uses ... who helped King George VI George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was concurrently the last Emp ... manage his stammer Stuttering, also known as stammering, is a speech ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

William Ewart Gladstone
William Ewart Gladstone (; 29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British statesman and Liberal Liberal or liberalism may refer to: Politics *a supporter of liberalism, a political and moral philosophy **Liberalism by country *an adherent of a Liberal Party Arts, entertainment and media *''El Liberal'', a Spanish newspaper published betw ... politician. In a career lasting over 60 years, he served for 12 years as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government The head of government is either the highest or second highest official in the executive branch of a sovereign state, a federated state, or a self-governing colony, aut ..., spread over four terms beginning in 1868 and ending in 1894. He also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer The chancellor of the Exchequer, often abbreviated to the chancellor, is a senior minister of the Crown Minister of the Crown is a formal constitutional t ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Howard De Walden Estate
The Howard de Walden Estate is a property estate in Marylebone, London, owned by the Baron Howard de Walden, Howard de Walden family. As of 2020 the estate was reported to be worth £4.7 billion. History The Estate's development dates from 1715 when speculative planning of Cavendish Square in London, and the streets around it began. The Marylebone manor and estate was purchased by the John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle, Duke of Newcastle in 1711. Dying soon after it passed to his daughter Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, Henrietta Cavendish Holles who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, Edward Harley, heir of the Earl of Oxford, in 1713. Both Edward’s father and uncle were active and influential in English politics during Queen Anne’s reign and it seems that his uncle Edward was behind the appointment of a steward and surveyor to begin marking out building plots and negotiating leases on Henrietta’s Marylebone estate. I ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Oxford Circus Tube Station
Oxford Circus is a London Underground station serving Oxford Circus at the junction of Regent Street and Oxford Street, with entrances on all four corners of the intersection. The station is an interchange between the Bakerloo line, Bakerloo, Central line (London Underground), Central and Victoria line, Victoria lines. As of , it was the fourth-busiest station on the London Underground. On the Central line it is between Bond Street tube station, Bond Street and Tottenham Court Road tube station, Tottenham Court Road, on the Bakerloo line it is between Regent's Park tube station, Regent's Park and Piccadilly Circus tube station, Piccadilly Circus, and on the Victoria line it is between Green Park tube station, Green Park and Warren Street tube station, Warren Street. The station is in List of stations in London fare zone 1, Travelcard Zone 1. The Central line station opened on 30 July 1900, and the Bakerloo line station on 10 March 1906. Both are Grade II listed. The station was ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Great Portland Street Tube Station
Great Portland Street is a London Underground station near Regent's Park. It is between and on the Hammersmith & City line, Hammersmith & City, Circle line (London Underground), Circle and Metropolitan line, Metropolitan lines. Great Portland Street station is listed as a building of National Significance and lies in Travelcard Zone 1. History The station was part of the world's first underground railway, the Metropolitan Railway, which opened between "Bishop's Road" (now ) on the Hammersmith & City line and "Farringdon Street" (close to the present-day station). It was opened on 10 January 1863 as "Portland Road", changed to its present name on 1 March 1917 but was renamed "Great Portland Street and Regents Park" in 1923 and then reverted to its present name in 1933. The current structure was built in 1930 on a traffic island on the Marylebone Road at its intersection with Great Portland Street and Albany Street. Its construction is a steel framed cream terracotta clad exte ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]