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Cornmarket Street
Cornmarket Street (colloquially referred to as Cornmarket or historically The Corn) is a major shopping street and pedestrian precinct in Oxford, England that runs north to south between Magdalen Street and Carfax Tower. To the east is the Golden Cross arcade of small jewellery and craft shops in a courtyard, leading to the Covered Market. To the west is the indoor Clarendon Shopping Centre that connects in an L-shape to Queen Street. Cornmarket was semi-pedestrianised and made a limited-access street in 1999. Cycling is allowed 6pm to 10am. In 2002, it was voted Britain's second worst street in a poll of listeners to the ''Today'' programme. The rating was largely due to a failed attempt to repave the street in 2001. The granite setts, which had been laid extensively, cracked and the contractor went into liquidation. In 2003, it was repaved again and new benches installed, amidst reports of budgetary problems. History of shops 26–28 Cornmarket on the corner of Ship St ...
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Oxford, England
Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2020, its population was estimated at 151,584. It is north-west of London, south-east of Birmingham and north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world; it has buildings in every style of English architecture since late Anglo-Saxon. Oxford's industries include motor manufacturing, education, publishing, information technology and science. History The history of Oxford in England dates back to its original settlement in the Saxon period. Originally of strategic significance due to its controlling location on the upper reaches of the River Thames at its junction with the River Cherwell, the town grew in national importance during the early Norman period, and in the late 12th century became home to the fledgling University of Oxford. The city was besieged during The Anarchy in 1142. The university rose to domin ...
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Pret A Manger, Cornmarket Street, Oxford - Geograph
Pret may refer to: *Preta, a ghost of the Hindu and Buddhist tradition *Pret a Manger Pret A Manger (''prêt à manger'' is French for ''ready to eat'') is an international sandwich shop franchise chain based in the United Kingdom, popularly referred to as Pret, founded in 1983. As of December 2022, Pret had 434 shops in the UK, ..., a British sandwich retail chain * Prêt-à-porter, ready-to-wear fashion; often abbreviated as ''Pret'', as in ''Pret-line'' {{Disambig ...
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Rubble Masonry
Rubble stone is rough, uneven building stone not laid in regular courses. It may fill the core of a wall which is faced with unit masonry such as brick or ashlar. Analogously, some medieval cathedral walls are outer shells of ashlar with an inner backfill of mortarless rubble and dirt. Square Rubble Masonry Square Rubble Masonry is where face stones are dressed (squared on all joints and beds) before laying, set in mortar and appear as the outer surface of a wall. History The sack masonry is born as an evolution of embankment covered with boards, stones or bricks. The coating was used to give the embankment greater strength and make it more difficult for the enemies to climb. The Sadd el-Khafara dam, 14 meters high and built in sacking masonry in Wadi Al-Garawi near Helwan in Egypt, dates back to 2900 - 2600 BC The Greeks called the brickwork emplecton and made use of it in particular in the construction of the defensive walls of their poleis. The Romans made extensiv ...
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William Holford, Baron Holford
William Graham Holford, Baron Holford, (22 March 1907 – 17 October 1975) was a British architect and town planner. Biography Holford was educated at Diocesan College, Cape Town and returned to Johannesburg. From 1925–30 he studied architecture at the University of Liverpool, where he won the British Prix de Rome in Architecture to the British School at Rome in 1930. While in Rome he met British mural painter Marjorie Brooks, who had independently won the British Prix de Rome for Painting, and married her in 1933. He was a lecturer at the University of Liverpool from 1933 and succeeded Patrick Abercrombie as Professor of Civic Design there in 1937. In 1948 he again succeeded Abercrombie as Professor of Town Planning at University College, London; a post he held until he retired in 1970. Holford was knighted in 1953 and on 29 January 1965 he was made a life peer as Baron Holford, of Kemp Town in the County of Sussex by the Wilson Government, the first town planner to be mad ...
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Thomas Wilfred Sharp
Thomas Wilfred Sharp (12 April 1901 – 27 January 1978) was an English town planner and writer on the built environment. Biography Sharp was born in Bishop Auckland in County Durham, England. He attended the local grammar school and, between 1918 and 1922, spent four years working for the borough surveyor. He then moved to Margate to work on the town's development plan, before working in Canterbury and London where he worked for the planning consultants Thomas Adams and Francis Longstreth Thompson. His next post was as regional planning assistant to the South West Lancashire Regional Advisory Group, but after credit for his lengthy report was given, as was traditional, to the honorary surveyor, he angrily resigned, and was unable to find work for two years. Sharp used this enforced leisure to write ''Town and Countryside'' (1932), which established him as a formidable polemicist. He challenged the garden city movement, which sought to unite town and country, by insisting on the ...
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Norman Architecture
The term Norman architecture is used to categorise styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans in the various lands under their dominion or influence in the 11th and 12th centuries. In particular the term is traditionally used for English Romanesque architecture. The Normans introduced large numbers of castles and fortifications including Norman keeps, and at the same time monasteries, abbeys, churches and cathedrals, in a style characterised by the usual Romanesque rounded arches (particularly over windows and doorways) and especially massive proportions compared to other regional variations of the style. Origins These Romanesque styles originated in Normandy and became widespread in northwestern Europe, particularly in England, which contributed considerable development and where the largest number of examples survived. At about the same time, a Norman dynasty that ruled in Sicily produced a distinctive variation–incorporating Byzantine and Sara ...
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Woolworths Group (United Kingdom)
Woolworth (officially Woolworths Group PLC) was a listed British company that owned the High Street retail chain Woolworths. It also owned other companies such as the entertainment distributor Entertainment UK, and book and resource distributor Bertram Books. The Woolworths store chain was the main enterprise of the group. Originally a division of the American F. W. Woolworth Company until its sale in the early 1980s, it had more than 800 stores in the UK prior to closure. Woolworths sold many goods and had its own Ladybird children's clothing range, WorthIt! value range and Chad Valley toys. They were also well known for selling Candyking pick 'n' mix sweets. It was sometimes referred to as Woolies by the UK media, the general public, and occasionally in its own television adverts. The British company also owned and ran F. W. Woolworth Ireland until 1984 and Woolworths (Cyprus) until 2003. On 26 November 2008, trading of shares in Woolworths Group was suspended, and ...
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Waterproof Clothing
Waterproof fabrics are fabrics that are, inherently, or have been treated to become, resistant to penetration by water and wetting. The term "waterproof" refers to conformance to a governing specification and specific conditions of a laboratory test method. They are usually natural or synthetic fabrics that are laminated or coated with a waterproofing material such as rubber, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU), silicone elastomer, fluoropolymers, and wax. Treatment could be either of the fabric during manufacture or of completed products after manufacture, for instance by a waterproofing spray. Examples include the rubberized fabric used in Mackintosh jackets, sauna suits and inflatable boats. Definition and specifications Waterproof/breathable fabrics resist liquid water passing through, but allow water vapour to pass through. Their ability to block out rain and snow while allowing vapour from sweat to evaporate leads to their use in rainwear, waterproof outdoor ...
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Zac's
Zacharias and Co. (colloquially known as "Zac's") was a waterproof clothing manufacturing firm and retailer based at 26–27 Cornmarket Street Oxford, England. Abraham Zacharias was a silversmith, jeweller, and watchmaker/clockmaker at 2 Cornmarket and 95 High Street in Oxford. He bought 27 Cornmarket and operated a china and glass warehouse here. Later, by 1880, Abraham Zacharias' son Joel Zacharias was in charge of the business. He married Rebecca Fankenstein from Manchester on 16 August 1882. By 1884, Joel Zacharias was selling waterproof clothing on the Oxford site. He also ran a branch in Manchester. In the late 1880s, Joel Zacharias expanded the business into 26 Cornmarket next door to the south. The two shops have been combined into a single premises one since this time. By around 1896 Joel Zacharias stopped selling china and glass to concentrate on the waterproof clothing business for which Zacharias and Co. became well-known. Joel Zacharias died in 1905 and the business wa ...
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Broad Street, Oxford
Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall. The street is known for its bookshops, including the original Blackwell's bookshop at number 50, located here due to the University of Oxford. Among residents, the street is traditionally known as The Broad. Location In Broad Street are Balliol College, Oxford, Balliol College, Trinity College, Oxford, Trinity College, Exeter College, Oxford, Exeter College (front entrance in the adjoining Turl Street). The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, Museum of the History of Science (in the original Ashmolean Museum building), the Clarendon Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Weston Library (renamed in 2015, part of the Bodleian Library, the main University library in Oxford) are important historical Oxford University buildings at the eastern end of the street. These buildings form the ''de facto'' centre of the University, since most academic buildings in the centre of Oxford are own ...
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Henry Taunt
Henry William Taunt (1842–1922) was a professional photographer, author, publisher and entertainer based in Oxford, England. Birth Henry Taunt was born in Penson's Gardens in the parish of St Ebbe's, Oxford. His father Henry was a plumber and glazier from Bletchingdon north of Oxford. Taunt's mother Martha Darter came from West Ilsley in Berkshire. Taunt's birth name was William Henry Taunt, which he used until at least his marriage in 1863. By 1871 he was known as Henry William Taunt, for the rest of his life. Career Taunt worked first for his father, but decided he did not want to become a plumber. From the age of 11 Taunt worked first for a tailor, then for a stationer and next at a bookshop and auction room. Both the tailor and the bookshop and auction room were in High Street, Oxford. In 1856, aged 14, Taunt joined the staff of Edward Bracher at 26 High Street. Bracher was Oxford's first commercial photographer, and for some years had a monopoly in the city. ...
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom and the British Empire, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the '' Belle Époque'' era of Continental Europe. There was a strong religious drive for higher moral standards led by the nonconformist churches, such as the Methodists and the evangelical wing of the established Church of England. Ideologically, the Victorian era witnessed resistance to the rationalism that defined the Georgian period, and an increasing turn towards romanticism and even mysticism in religion, social values, and arts. This era saw a staggering amount of technological innovations that proved key to Britain's power and prosperity. Doctors started moving away from tradition and mysticism towards a science-based approach; medicine advanced thanks to the a ...
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