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Companies Act 1862
The Companies Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict. c.89) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom regulating UK company law, whose descendant is the Companies Act 2006. Provisions *s 6 'Any seven or more persons associated for any lawful purpose may, by subscribing their names to a memorandum of association, and otherwise complying with the requisitions of this Act in respect of registration, form an incorporated company, with or without limited liability.' *s 8 'Where a company is formed on the principle of having the liability of its members limited to the amount unpaid on their shares, hereinafter referred to as a company limited by shares, the Memorandum of Association shall contain the following things' the third of which was 'objects for which the proposed company is to be established.' *s 11 'The memorandum of association... shall, when registered, bind the company and the members thereof to the same extent as if each member had subscribed his name and affixed his seal thereto, ...
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Short Title
In certain jurisdictions, including the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia), as well as the United States and the Philippines, primary legislation has both a short title and a long title. The long title (properly, the title in some jurisdictions) is the formal title appearing at the head of a statute (such as an act of Parliament or of Congress) or other legislative instrument. The long title is intended to provide a summarised description of the purpose or scope of the instrument. Like other descriptive components of an act (such as the preamble, section headings, side notes, and short title), the long title seldom affects the operative provisions of an act, except where the operative provisions are unclear or ambiguous and the long title provides a clear statement of the legislature's intention. The short title is the formal name by which legislation may by law be cited. It contrasts with the long title which, while us ...
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Companies Act
Companies Act (with its variations) is a stock short title used for legislation in Botswana, Hong Kong, India, Kenya, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom in relation to company law. The Bill for an Act with this short title will usually have been known as a Companies Bill during its passage through Parliament. Companies Acts may be a generic name either for legislation bearing that short title or for all legislation which relates to company law. List Botswana *The Companies Act 2007 India *The Indian Companies Act 1882 *The Companies Act 1913 *The Companies Act 1956 *The Companies Act 2013 Kenya * The Companies Act 1962 (Cap 486) * The Companies Act 2015 Malaysia *The Companies Act 1965 New Zealand * Companies Act 1993 (originallJoint Stock Companies Act 1860 Singapore *The Companies Act 1967 (Cap 50) Brunei *The Companies Act 1984 South Africa *The Companies Act, 1973 *The Companies Act, 2008 United Kingdom *The Royal Exchange and London ...
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Modern Library
The Modern Library is an American book publishing imprint and formerly the parent company of Random House. Founded in 1917 by Albert Boni and Horace Liveright as an imprint of their publishing company Boni & Liveright, Modern Library became an independent publishing company in 1925 when Boni & Liveright sold it to Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. Random House began in 1927 as a subsidiary of the Modern Library and eventually overtook its parent company, with Modern Library becoming an imprint of Random House. Recent history The Modern Library originally published only hardbound books. In 1950, it began publishing the Modern Library College Editions, a forerunner of its current series of paperback classics. From 1955 to 1960, the company published a high quality, numbered paperback series, but discontinued it in 1960, when the series was merged into the newly acquired Vintage paperbacks group. The Modern Library homepage states: In 1992, on the occasion of the Modern Library ...
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Effingham Wilson
Effingham William Wilson (28 September 1785 – 9 June 1868) was a 19th-century English radical publisher and bookseller. His main interests were in economics and politics, but he also published poetry. Early life Wilson was born at Ravensworth in the North Riding of Yorkshire, one of at least five sons to Joseph Wilson (born c.1734) and his wife Jane Hutchinson. Some of his relations had farmed under the Earl of Effingham, which resulted in Wilson's distinctive Christian name. "His earliest years were most happily passed in the neighbourhood of the place of his birth" according to his biography. When still a boy he was removed to Knaresborough, where he resided with his physician uncle, Dr. Thomas Hutchinson FSA (d. March 1797), to be trained in the medical profession. Dr Hutchinson was "a man of taste and literature" and a friend of William and Dorothy Wordsworth. Also a keen phrenologist, he owned the skull of the murderer Eugene Aram, having taken the head from the gibb ...
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Companies Act 1985
The Companies Act 1985 (c. 6) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, enacted in 1985, which enabled companies to be formed by registration, and set out the responsibilities of companies, their directors and secretaries. It has largely been superseded by the Companies Act 2006. The Act was a consolidation of various other pieces of company legislation, and was one component of the rules governing companies in England and Wales and in Scotland. A company will also be governed by its own memorandum and articles of association. Table A, which lays out default articles of association, was not included in the body of the Act, as it had been in all previous Companies Acts. Instead, it was introduced by statutory instrument - the Companies (Tables A to F) Regulations 1985. The Act applied only to companies incorporated under it, or under earlier Companies Acts. Sole traders, partnerships, limited liability partnerships etc. were ...
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Companies Act 1948
The Companies Act 1948 (11 & 12 Geo.6 c.38) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which regulated UK company law. Its descendant is the Companies Act 2006. Cases decided under this Act *''Bushell v Faith'' 970AC 1099 *''Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society Ltd v Meyer'' *''Stonegate Securities Ltd v Gregory'' 980Ch 576 See also *Companies Act Companies Act (with its variations) is a stock short title used for legislation in Botswana, Hong Kong, India, Kenya, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom in relation to company law. The Bill for an Act with this short title ... Notes {{UK legislation United Kingdom company law United Kingdom Acts of Parliament 1948 1940s economic history ...
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Companies Act 1929
The Companies Act 1929 (19 & 20 Geo.5 c.23) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which regulated UK company law. Its descendant is the Companies Act 2006. Provisions Forms made under the 1929 Act introduced the term "Companies Court", referring to the High Court, Chancery Division, when exercising its jurisdiction for company law matters (''Re Tasbian Ltd (No 2)'' 990BCC 322, 324). *s 77(1) authorised the court in a compulsory winding up to direct the liquidator either to prosecute the offender himself or to refer the matter to the Director of Public Prosecutions. If it appeared to the liquidator in a voluntary winding up that any past or present director, manager or other officer of the company had been guilty of an offence in relation to the company for which he was criminally liable, section 77(2) required him to report the matter to the Director of Public Prosecutions. It also required the liquidator to give the Director of Public Prosecutions information and a ...
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Companies (Consolidation) Act 1908
The Companies (Consolidation) Act 1908 was a United Kingdom Act of Parliament, which regulated UK company law. Its descendant is the Companies Act 2006. Cases decided under this Act *''Re Parkes Garage (Swadlincote) Ltd'' 9291 Ch 139 See also *Companies Act Companies Act (with its variations) is a stock short title used for legislation in Botswana, Hong Kong, India, Kenya, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom in relation to company law. The Bill for an Act with this short title ... Notes {{UK legislation United Kingdom company law United Kingdom Acts of Parliament 1908 1900s economic history ...
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Joint Stock Companies Act 1856
The Joint Stock Companies Act 1856 (19 & 20 Vict c 47) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was a consolidating statute, recognised as the founding piece of modern United Kingdom company law legislation. Overview Unlike other Acts of Parliament that preceded it, the 1856 Act provided a simple administrative procedure by which any group of seven people could register a limited liability company for themselves. Companies involved in banking and insurance were explicitly excluded from the provisions of the Act. Debate The Joint Stock Companies Bill was introduced to Parliament by the then Vice President of the Board of Trade, Robert Lowe. In doing so he proclaimed the right of every citizen to have freedom of contract and with it obtain limited liability for operating a business. Companies had until recently been prohibited, as a result of the Bubble Act and the stock market panics of the early 18th century. There was still a lot of suspicion of companies, bu ...
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Limited Liability Act 1855
The Limited Liability Act 1855 (18 & 19 Vict c 133) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that first expressly allowed limited liability for corporations that could be established by the general public in England and Wales as well as Ireland. The Act did not apply to Scotland, where the limited liability of shareholders for the debts company debts had been recognised since the mid-Eighteenth century with the decision in the case of ''Stevenson v McNair''. Although the validity of the decision in that case had come to be doubted by the mid-Nineteenth century, the Joint Stock Companies Act 1856 – which applied across the UK – put the matter beyond doubt, settling that Scottish 'companies' could be possessed of both separate legal personality and limited liability. Overview Under the Act, shareholders were still liable directly to creditors, for the unpaid portion of their shares. The modern principle that shareholders are liable to the corporation was intr ...
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History Of Companies
A corporation is an organization—usually a group of people or a company—authorized by the state to act as a single entity (a legal entity recognized by private and public law "born out of statute"; a legal person in legal context) and recognized as such in law for certain purposes. Early incorporated entities were established by charter (i.e. by an ''ad hoc'' act granted by a monarch or passed by a parliament or legislature). Most jurisdictions now allow the creation of new corporations through registration. Corporations come in many different types but are usually divided by the law of the jurisdiction where they are chartered based on two aspects: by whether they can issue stock, or by whether they are formed to make a profit. Depending on the number of owners, a corporation can be classified as ''aggregate'' (the subject of this article) or '' sole'' (a legal entity consisting of a single incorporated office occupied by a single natural person). One of the most attra ...
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The Gondoliers
''The Gondoliers; or, The King of Barataria'' is a Savoy Opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It premiered at the Savoy Theatre on 7 December 1889 and ran for a very successful 554 performances (at that time the fifth longest-running piece of musical theatre in history), closing on 30 June 1891. This was the twelfth comic opera collaboration of fourteen between Gilbert and Sullivan. The story of the opera concerns the young bride of the heir to the throne of the fictional kingdom of Barataria who arrives in Venice to join her husband. It turns out, however, that he cannot be identified, since he was entrusted to the care of a drunken gondolier who mixed up the prince with his own son. To complicate matters, the King of Barataria has just been killed. The two young gondoliers must now jointly rule the kingdom until the nurse of the prince can be brought in to determine which of them is the rightful king. Moreover, when the young queen arrives ...
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