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CD-Text
CD-Text is an extension of the Red Book Compact Disc specifications standard for audio CDs. It allows storage of additional information (e.g. album name, song name, and artist name) on a standards-compliant audio CD. The specification for CD-Text was included in the Multi-Media Commands Set 3 R01 (MMC-3) standard, released in September 1996 and backed by Sony. It was also added to new revisions of the Red Book. The actual text is stored in a format compatible with Interactive Text Transmission System (ITTS), defined in the IEC 61866 standard.IEC 61866:1997 Audiovisual systems – Interactive text transmission system (ITTS)
The ITTS standard is also applied in the

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CD-Text (logo)
CD-Text is an extension of the Red Book Compact Disc specifications standard for audio CDs. It allows storage of additional information (e.g. album name, song name, and artist name) on a standards-compliant audio CD. The specification for CD-Text was included in the Multi-Media Commands Set 3 R01 (MMC-3) standard, released in September 1996 and backed by Sony. It was also added to new revisions of the Red Book. The actual text is stored in a format compatible with Interactive Text Transmission System (ITTS), defined in the IEC 61866 standard.IEC 61866:1997 Audiovisual systems – Interactive text transmission system (ITTS)
The ITTS standard is also applied in the

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Red Book (CD Standard)
The Rainbow Books are a collection of CD format specifications. ''Red Book'' (1980) *CD-DA (''Digital Audio'') – standardized as IEC 60908 **CD-Text—a 1996 extension to CD-DA ** CD-MIDI—part of the original red-book standard **CD+G (''plus Graphics'') – karaoke *** CD+EG / CD+XG (''plus Extended Graphics'') – an extension of CD+G ''Yellow Book'' (1983) *CD-ROM (''Read-Only Memory'') – standardized as ISO/IEC 10149 in 1988 and ECMA-130 in 1989 **CD-ROM XA (''eXtended Architecture'') – a 1991 extension of CD-ROM ''Green Book'' (1986) *CD-i (''Interactive'') ''Orange Book'' (1990) Orange is a reference to the fact that red and yellow mix to orange. This correlates with the fact that CD-R and CD-RW are capable of audio ("Red") and data ("Yellow"); although other colors (other CD standards) that do not mix are capable of being burned onto the physical medium. ''Orange Book'' also introduced the standard for multisession writing. *CD-MO (''Magneto-Optical'' ...
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Vorbis Comment
A Vorbis comment is a metadata container used in the Vorbis, FLAC, Theora, Speex and Opus file formats. It allows information such as the title, artist, album, track number or other information about the file to be added to the file itself. However, as the official Ogg Vorbis documentation notes, “ he comment headeris meant for short, text comments, not arbitrary metadata; arbitrary metadata belongs in a separate logical bitstream (usually an XML stream type) that provides greater structure and machine parseability.” Instead, the intended function of Vorbis comments is to approximate the kind of information that might be hand-inked onto a blank faced CD-R or CD-RW: a few lines of notes briefly detailing the content. Format A Vorbis tag is a list of fields in the format FieldName=Data. The field name can be composed of printable ASCII characters, 0x20 (''space'') through 0x7D (‘}’), with 0x3D (‘=’) and 0x7E (‘~’) excluded. It is case insensitive, so artist and ARTI ...
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International Standard Recording Code
The International Standard Recording Code (ISRC) is an international standard code for uniquely identifying sound recordings and music video recordings. The code was developed by the recording industry in conjunction with the ISO technical committee 46, subcommittee 9 (TC 46/SC 9), which codified the standard as ISO 3901 in 1986, and updated it in 2001. An ISRC identifies a particular ''recording'', not the work (composition and lyrical content) itself. Therefore, different recordings, edits, and remixes of the same work should each have their own ISRC. Works are identified by ISWC. Recordings remastered or revised in other ways are usually assigned a new ISRC. History ISO 3901 was completed in 1986. In 1988, the IFPI recommended that its member companies adopt ISRCs for music videos. In 1989, the ISO designated the IFPI as the registration authority for ISRCs. The IFPI, in turn, delegated part of the administration of ISRCs to several dozen national agencies, which allocate I ...
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Compact Disc
The compact disc (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips and Sony to store and play digital audio recordings. In August 1982, the first compact disc was manufactured. It was then released in October 1982 in Japan and branded as '' Digital Audio Compact Disc''. The format was later adapted (as CD-ROM) for general-purpose data storage. Several other formats were further derived, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video CD (VCD), Super Video CD (SVCD), Photo CD, Picture CD, Compact Disc-Interactive (CD-i) and Enhanced Music CD. Standard CDs have a diameter of and are designed to hold up to 74 minutes of uncompressed stereo digital audio or about 650  MiB of data. Capacity is routinely extended to 80 minutes and 700  MiB by arranging data more closely on the same sized disc. The Mini CD has various diameters ranging from ; they are sometimes used for CD singles, storing up to 24 minu ...
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Compact Disc
The compact disc (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips and Sony to store and play digital audio recordings. In August 1982, the first compact disc was manufactured. It was then released in October 1982 in Japan and branded as '' Digital Audio Compact Disc''. The format was later adapted (as CD-ROM) for general-purpose data storage. Several other formats were further derived, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video CD (VCD), Super Video CD (SVCD), Photo CD, Picture CD, Compact Disc-Interactive (CD-i) and Enhanced Music CD. Standard CDs have a diameter of and are designed to hold up to 74 minutes of uncompressed stereo digital audio or about 650  MiB of data. Capacity is routinely extended to 80 minutes and 700  MiB by arranging data more closely on the same sized disc. The Mini CD has various diameters ranging from ; they are sometimes used for CD singles, storing up to 24 minu ...
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DBCS
A double-byte character set (DBCS) is a character encoding in which either all characters (including control characters) are encoded in two bytes, or merely every graphic character not representable by an accompanying single-byte character set (SBCS) is encoded in two bytes (Han characters would generally comprise most of these two-byte characters). A DBCS supports national languages that contain many unique characters or symbols (the maximum number of characters that can be represented with one byte is 256 characters, while two bytes can represent up to 65,536 characters). Examples of such languages include Japanese and Chinese. Korean Hangul does not contain as many characters, but KS X 1001 supports both Hangul and Hanja, and uses two bytes per character. In CJK (Chinese/Japanese/Korean) computing The term ''DBCS'' traditionally refers to a character encoding where each graphic character is encoded in two bytes. In an 8-bit code, such as Big-5 or Shift JIS, a character from t ...
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CDVU+
CDVU+ (pronounced "CD View Plus") was a type of enhanced CD released by Walt Disney Company in 2007. It was essentially a revamped version of the Compact Disc (CD), and includes multimedia "Extras" on the disc. New features such as "digital magazine extras" like band photos, interviews, lyrics, and exclusive photos could be accessed by inserting the disc into a computer. Announced CDVU+ releases *Jonas Brothers - ''Jonas Brothers'', '' A Little Bit Longer'', ''Lines, Vines and Trying Times'' *Jesse McCartney - '' Departure'' * The Cheetah Girls - '' The Cheetah Girls One World'' *Plain White T's - '' Every Second Counts'', '' Big Bad World'' * Atreyu *Demi Lovato - ''Don't Forget'', '' Here We Go Again'' Cancelled CDVU+ releases *Hilary Duff - Dignity Dignity is the right of a person to be valued and respected for their own sake, and to be treated ethically. It is of significance in morality, ethics, law and politics as an extension of the Enlightenment-era concepts of i ...
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CD+G
CD+G (also known as CD-G, CD+Graphics and TV-Graphics) is an extension of the compact disc standard that can present low-resolution graphics alongside the audio data on the disc when played on a compatible device. CD+G discs are often used for karaoke machines, which use this functionality to present on-screen lyrics for the song contained on the disc. The CD+G specifications were published by Philips and Sony as an extension of the Red Book (CD standard) specifications. The first CD to be released with CD+G graphics was '' Eat or Be Eaten'' by Firesign Theatre in 1985. The CD+EG is a similar format that allows for better graphics, but has very rarely been implemented in releases. Design The CD+G format takes advantage of the six Compact Disc subcode channels R through W (which are unused in standard Compact Disc Digital Audio), to provide 6 extra bits in CD+G for graphics information per 24 bytes of audio data. When a disc is read at normal speed, these six channels provide ...
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Code Page 932 (Microsoft Windows)
Microsoft Windows code page 932 (abbreviated MS932, Windows-932 or ambiguously CP932), also called Windows-31J amongst other names (see § Terminology below), is the Microsoft Windows code page for the Japanese language, which is an extended variant of the Shift JIS Japanese character encoding. It contains standard 7-bit ASCII codes, and Japanese characters are indicated by the high bit of the first byte being set to 1. Some code points in this page require a second byte, so characters use either 8 or 16 bits for encoding. IBM offer the same extended double-byte codes in their code page 943 (IBM-943 or CP943), which is a combination of the single-byte Code page 897 and the double-byte Code page 941. Windows-31J is the most used non-UTF-8/Unicode Japanese encoding on the web. Actually is the much more declared encoding, but by W3C/WHATWG HTML standards, the encodings are declared the same, and while the latter name is used in the standards it's defined to decode the former. S ...
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Latin-1
ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998, ''Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 1: Latin alphabet No. 1'', is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII-based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. ISO/IEC 8859-1 encodes what it refers to as "Latin alphabet no. 1", consisting of 191 characters from the Latin script. This character-encoding scheme is used throughout the Americas, Western Europe, Oceania, and much of Africa. It is the basis for some popular 8-bit character sets and the first two blocks of characters in Unicode. ISO-8859-1 was (according to the standard, at least) the default encoding of documents delivered via HTTP with a MIME type beginning with "text/" (HTML5 changed this to Windows-1252). , 1.3% of all (but only 8 of the top 1000) web sites use . It is the most ''declared'' single-byte character encoding in the world on the Web, but as Web browsers interpret it as the superset Windows-1252, the documents ...
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ASCII
ASCII ( ), abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character encoding standard for electronic communication. ASCII codes represent text in computers, telecommunications equipment, and other devices. Because of technical limitations of computer systems at the time it was invented, ASCII has just 128 code points, of which only 95 are , which severely limited its scope. All modern computer systems instead use Unicode, which has millions of code points, but the first 128 of these are the same as the ASCII set. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) prefers the name US-ASCII for this character encoding. ASCII is one of the IEEE milestones. Overview ASCII was developed from telegraph code. Its first commercial use was as a seven-bit teleprinter code promoted by Bell data services. Work on the ASCII standard began in May 1961, with the first meeting of the American Standards Association's (ASA) (now the American National Standards Institu ...
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