HOME
*



picture info

Au Clair De La Lune
"" (, ) is a French folk song of the 18th century. Its composer and lyricist are unknown. Its simple melody () is commonly taught to beginners learning an instrument. Lyrics The song appears as early as 1820 i''Le Voiture Verseés'' with only the first verse. Four verses were later re-published in the 1858 compilation ''Chants et Chansons populaires de la France''. In the 1870 compilation ''Chansons et Rondes Enfantines'', only the first two verses of the original four were retained. Some sources report that "plume" (pen) was originally "lume" (an old word for "light" or "lamp"). Much of the lyrics has sexual innuendos. In music 19th-century French composer Camille Saint-Saëns quoted the first few notes of the tune in the section "The Fossils", part of his suite ''The Carnival of the Animals''. French composer Ferdinand Hérold wrote a set of variations for piano solo in E-flat major. Claude Debussy, composer of the similarly named " Clair de lune" from his ''Suite ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




Au Clair De La Lune Children's Book 2
Au, AU, au or a.u. may refer to: Science and technology Computing * .au, the internet country code for Australia * Au file format, Sun Microsystems' audio format * Audio Units, a system level plug-in architecture from Apple Computer * Adobe Audition, a sound editor program * Windows Update or Automatic Updates, in Microsoft Windows * Windows 10 Anniversary Update, of August 2016a * Gold, symbol Au (from Latin ), a chemical element * Absorbance unit, a reporting unit in spectroscopy * Atomic units, a system of units convenient for atomic physics and other fields * Ångström unit, a unit of length equal to 10−10 m or 0.1 nanometre. * Astronomical unit, a unit of length often used in Solar System astronomy, an approximation for the average distance between the Earth and the Sun * Arbitrary unit, a relative placeholder unit for when the actual value of a measurement is unknown or unimportant ("a.u." is deprecated, use "arb. unit" instead) Arts and entertainment Music * AU ( ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Marc Blitzstein
Marcus Samuel Blitzstein (March 2, 1905January 22, 1964), was an American composer, lyricist, and librettist. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro- union musical ''The Cradle Will Rock'', directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is known for ''The Cradle Will Rock'' and for his off-Broadway translation/adaptation of ''The Threepenny Opera'' by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. His works also include the opera '' Regina'', an adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play '' The Little Foxes''; the Broadway musical '' Juno'', based on Seán O'Casey's play '' Juno and the Paycock''; and ''No for an Answer''. He completed translation/adaptations of Brecht's and Weill's musical play '' Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny'' and of Brecht's play ''Mother Courage and Her Children'' with music by Paul Dessau. Blitzstein also composed music for films, such as ''Surf and Seaweed'' (1931) and '' The Spanish Earth'' (1937), and he contributed two son ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Maxwell Anderson
James Maxwell Anderson (December 15, 1888 – February 28, 1959) was an American playwright, author, poet, journalist, and lyricist. Background Anderson was born on December 15, 1888, in Atlantic, Pennsylvania, the second of eight children to William Lincoln "Link" Anderson, a Baptist minister, and Charlotte Perrimela ('Premely') Stephenson, both of Scotch-Irish descent. His family initially lived on his maternal grandmother Sheperd's farm in Atlantic, then moved to Andover, Ohio, where his father became a railroad fireman while studying to become a minister. They moved often, to follow their father's ministerial posts, and Maxwell was frequently sick, missing a great deal of school. He used his time sick in bed to read voraciously, and both his parents and Aunt Emma were storytellers, which contributed to Anderson's love of literature. During a visit to his grandmother's house in Atlantic, at age 11, he met the first love of his life, Hallie Loomis, a slightly older girl from ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Whittaker Chambers
Whittaker Chambers (born Jay Vivian Chambers; April 1, 1901 – July 9, 1961) was an American writer-editor, who, after early years as a Communist Party member (1925) and Soviet spy (1932–1938), defected from the Soviet underground (1938), worked for ''Time'' magazine (1939–1948), and then testified about the Ware Group in what became the Hiss case for perjury (1949–1950), often referred to as the trial of the century, all described in his 1952 memoir ''Witness''. Afterwards, he worked as a senior editor at ''National Review'' (1957–1959). US President Ronald Reagan awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1984. Background Chambers was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and spent his infancy in Brooklyn. His family moved to Lynbrook, Long Island, New York State, in 1904, where he grew up and attended school. His parents were Jay Chambers and Laha Whittaker. He described his childhood as troubled because of his parents' separation and their ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Edward Young
Edward Young (c. 3 July 1683 – 5 April 1765) was an English poet, best remembered for ''Night-Thoughts'', a series of philosophical writings in blank verse, reflecting his state of mind following several bereavements. It was one of the most popular poems of the century, influencing Goethe and Edmund Burke, among many others, with its notable illustrations by William Blake. Young also took holy orders, and wrote many fawning letters in search of preferment, attracting accusations of insincerity. Early life Young was a son of Edward Young, later Dean of Salisbury, and was born at his father's rectory at Upham, near Winchester, where he was baptized on 3 July 1683. He was educated at Winchester College, and matriculated at New College, Oxford, in 1702. He later migrated to Corpus Christi, and in 1708 was nominated by Archbishop Tenison to a law fellowship at All Souls. He took his degree of Doctor of Canon Law in 1719.Chisholm, 1911 Literary career Young's first pu ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Pierre-Auguste Vafflard
Pierre Antoine Augustin Vafflard (19 December 1777 – 7 September 1837) was a French painter who specialized in history, genre scenes and portraits. His later paintings are in the Troubadour style. Life and work Vafflard was born in Paris. He was a student of Jean-Baptiste Regnault. He exhibited at the Salon beginning in 1800 and won the Gold Medal in 1824 for "Dernière bénédiction de l'évêque Bourlier" (The last blessing of ). Under the July Monarchy, he was responsible for pictorial restorative work at the galleries in the Château de Versailles and the "Galerie de Diane" at the palais des Tuileries. He also did church decorations. In 1834, he was a major exhibitor at the "Exposition d'objets d'arts et d'industrie anciens et modernes" in Bordeaux, from which all profits were distributed to the poor. He died in Paris in 1837. Vafflard's works are in museums throughout France as well as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. One of his most often reproduced image ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Vocal Ensemble
A choir ( ; also known as a chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble of singers. Choral music, in turn, is the music written specifically for such an ensemble to perform. Choirs may perform music from the classical music repertoire, which spans from the medieval era to the present, or popular music repertoire. Most choirs are led by a conductor, who leads the performances with arm, hand, and facial gestures. The term ''choir'' is very often applied to groups affiliated with a church (whether or not they actually occupy the quire), whereas a ''chorus'' performs in theatres or concert halls, but this distinction is not rigid. Choirs may sing without instruments, or accompanied by a piano, pipe organ, a small ensemble, or an orchestra. A choir can be a subset of an ensemble; thus one speaks of the "woodwind choir" of an orchestra, or different "choirs" of voices or instruments in a polychoral composition. In typical 18th century to 21st century oratorios and masses, 'choru ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Fred Momotenko
Alfred Momotenko-Levitsky (born 1970), also known as Fred Momotenko, is a Dutch composer. Education Alfred Momotenko-Levitsky studied percussion at the Moscow State Art and Cultural University, Russia. In 1990, he was invited to perform in the Netherlands, after which he enrolled in the Brabants Conservatory, majoring in percussion in improvised music. After graduating Momotenko continued with styding of musical theory and composition contemporary classical music and continued his study at Fontys Conservatory in Tilburg. In 2006, he graduated in composition with a Bachelor of Music. In 2009, he gained his Master of Music with distinction at Fontys Conservatorium. As a part of this program he followed sonology at the Institute of Sonology at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. Compositions * ''Menuetto'' (2001) – for church organ * ''Drinklied'' (2002) – for voice & vibraphone. Drinklied is based on the original poem from the Dutch poet Gerrit Krol. Honored with the fir ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




Télérama
''Télérama'' is a weekly French cultural and television magazine published in Paris, France. The name is a contraction of its earlier title: ''Télévision-Radio-Cinéma''. Fabienne Pascaud is currently managing editor. Ludovic Desautez is deputy editor for digital. Valérie Hurier is deputy editor for print. History and profile ''Télérama'' was established in 1947. Its founder was the Christian journalist Georges Montaron. The magazine had been published by Hachette Filipacchi until 2001 when it began to be published by Quebecor World Inc. The magazine has been owned by La Vie-Le Monde since 2003. It is published on a weekly basis on Wednesdays by Publications de la Vie Catholique. The magazine had a Christianity-oriented political stance. The headquarters of ''Télérama'' is in Paris. Its primary contents are television and radio Radio is the technology of signaling and communicating using radio waves. Radio waves are electromagnetic waves of frequency between 3 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Radio-Canada
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (french: Société Radio-Canada), branded as CBC/Radio-Canada, is a Canadian public broadcaster for both radio and television. It is a federal Crown corporation that receives funding from the government. The English- and French-language service units of the corporation are commonly known as CBC and Radio-Canada, respectively. Although some local stations in Canada predate the CBC's founding, CBC is the oldest existing broadcasting network in Canada. The CBC was established on November 2, 1936. The CBC operates four terrestrial radio networks: The English-language CBC Radio One and CBC Music, and the French-language Ici Radio-Canada Première and Ici Musique. (International radio service Radio Canada International historically transmitted via shortwave radio, but since 2012 its content is only available as podcasts on its website.) The CBC also operates two terrestrial television networks, the English-language CBC Television and the French ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), commonly referred to as the Berkeley Lab, is a United States national laboratory that is owned by, and conducts scientific research on behalf of, the United States Department of Energy. Located in the hills of Berkeley, California, the lab overlooks the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, and is managed by the University of California system. History 1931–1941 The laboratory was founded on August 26, 1931, by Ernest Lawrence, as the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, associated with the Physics Department. It centered physics research around his new instrument, the cyclotron, a type of particle accelerator for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1939. Throughout the 1930s, Lawrence pushed to create larger and larger machines for physics research, courting private philanthropists for funding. He was the first to develop a large team to build big projects to make discove ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]